It’s Sunday. Let’s play.

First up, screen shots of an ad that appeared a WaPo article.

Now, some images that don’t fit into Fiber Monday, Thursday rants, or Furry Fridays.

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Furry Friday, 7/23/21.

Doggie wogs are silly sometimes.

Magpies!

Trash parrots learn from each other. More about Australian suburban birds.

Monkey ducks!

The world is a cat.

Confused dog (watch the whole thing).

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Even with a fulling functional human being with integrity in the White House, there are still things to rant about.

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Note on the select committee’s hearing(s):

I watched much of the live testimony on Tuesday in the select committee on Tuesday to investigate the January 6 insurrection. The testimony of the four law enforcement officers was graphic and absolutely heartbreaking. Here it is from the New York Times; I suspect you can find some or all of it on YouTube. The video at the link has sadly been edited down now to the most dramatic parts. When I was watching it, it was the complete hearing; but I accidentally closed the tab, and when I reopened it, the edited version appeared. But the edited version is still graphic and heartbreaking. I cannot imagine the trauma those officers suffered and how afterward they felt betrayed by some of the congressman and senators. These testimonies affected me deeply.

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Unraveled Wednesday, 7/28/21.

Joining Kat and friends for Unraveled Wednesday.

Knitting.

I sent off the blue hats today to the #HATNOTHATE project, fourteen in all. And I have four hats to start next year’s project; they are either not blocked or still damp or unfinished. This is such a fun project to knit for. Who among us does not like to knit hats?

The Big Red Blob was at a spot where I needed to do some math and measuring, which meant I couldn’t just pick it up when we sat down to watch TV. I had another pattern selected that would be small enough to be a carry-along project, but when I tried to grab the yarn — MC and CC — I couldn’t find the latter. So I grabbed some blue yarn and started another hat. That is the UFO mentioned above.

Reading.

Only I Can Fix It by by Carol Leonnig and  Philip Rucker. I am in the midst of this tome. The only thing I can say about it at this point has already been said widely: “[The atmosphere inside the White House] was worse than you ever imagined.” This is the eighth book I have read about t***p and/or the pandemic; any book about either subject written in the past year necessarily has a lot to say about the other subject. 4✭

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Hidden Valley Road: Inside the Mind of an American Family by Robert Kolker. What an amazing story! Nonfiction, this book tells the story of the Galvin family: twelve kids — ten boys and two girls — and six of the boys developed schizophrenia. It was like jungle/survival of the fittest in that house, a horrible place to grow up. Most of it is set in the 1950s and 1960s, a time when treatment of mental illness was not very developed. If you have any interest in mental illness, you will find this book fascinating 4✭

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The Nightmare by Lars Kepler. This is the second in the Joona Linna series; I believe there are five to date. Suitably intriguing plot, some really, really bad guys, and Joona, our hero. 3✭

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Listening.

The Rose Code by Kate Quinn. Still listening. Two-thirds of the way through. Still liking it a lot. 4✭

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Watching.

The X Files, season nine. In one episode that we watched this week not only was Muldur not in it, neither was Scully except for a tiny moment.

Note on a previous post: those awesome arrangements of stones and shells I posted about on Sunday are the work of Instagrammer sculpttheworld.

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Fiber Monday.

Custom quilts for foster kids. Link from Kat’s blog.

Surprise!

The agonizing life of a professional knitter.

I love this stitch pattern. Tried to knit a cowl that used it. Failed. Someday I will try again.

Posted in LInks knitting | 3 Comments

Beach beauties.

I don’t know anything about these. They just show up in my IG feed. Aren’t they beautiful?

thanks to kitten with a whip©, I now know that these are work of sculpttheworld. Go check him out on IG.

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Lock up the links.

This could never happen in Nebraska.

Let’s talk about wombats.

And now, some IG screen grabs that don’t fit into Furry Friday or Rants.

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Furry, feathery, etc. Friday.

Flamingo learning to be a flamingo.

Cats watching Cats!.

A good Samaritan to our furry friends.

Smokey has been watching these videos lately.

Cats interrupt work.

Cat People.

I cannot stand it when dogs are smarter than their owners.

Beagles are not built for agility courses. And some others are not built for obstacle courses.

Hey, we haven’t had any falcons in our Furry Friday sessions. Let’s fix that right now.

A horse with suspenders.

Everything is garbage but the bear cam is good. Bear cam.

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Rants, various.

Talking out of both sides of their mouths. Click the video.

Posted in Rants, various | 4 Comments

Unraveled Wednesday, 7/21/21.

Joining Kat and friends for Unraveled Wednesday.

Knitting.

The Big Red Blob is not saying anything, just growing…ever so slowly.

Reading.

Oil and Marble by Stephanie Storey. This novel covers the period from 1499 to 1504, concentrating on the final three years of that time, when the rivals Leonardo* and Michelangelo were both in Florence. This former art history major loved it. Leonardo is nearing fifty, and his talents — as a painter, sculptor, scientist, engineer — are in high demand. His nickname is Il Maestro, but it could just as easily been Il Dandy for his lively and stylish garb. He is elegant and aloof, in contrast to the twenty-four-year-old scruffy, moody sculptor, Michelangelo. The younger man has just come off carving his celebrated Pietà in Rome and is coming home to his family; his father despises him as just another dirty stonemason. The two artists compete for attention and, more importantly, the right to carve a huge block of marble into a standing David. We now know that the scruffy, moody younger man won that competition and carved a masterpiece. Leonardo went on to paint the Mona Lisa, a portrait of a silk merchant’s young wife on whom the artist has a crush. The writing here is straightforward; it reminded me of any number of young adult books. But after getting used to that style I found this book fascinating. 4✭

The Plot by Jean Hanff Korelitz. Protagonist is a would-be novelist teaching creative writing. His first book was a smash hit, but his second one bombed, and he hasn’t been able to write anything decent since. At a two-week seminar one of the students describes the plot of the novel he plans to write. However, he dies in an accident and the book is never published. When protagonist learns of the student’s death, he uses the plot to write a novel… which goes platinum. He worries that that long-ago student might have described the book to a friend or relative, and he lives in fear that his new-found fame will evaporate. 3✭

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Ocean Prey by John Sandford. A Lucas Davenport book with an appearance by Virgil Flowers — what’s not to like? The Davenport and Flowers series are pretty much always excellent. The characters are intelligent and a bit sarcastic, so the dialogue is entertaining. In this one there was a shooting of three Coast Guard seamen, a crime that remains unsolved after several months, even with a task force peopled with agents from the FBI, the Coast Guard, the DEA, several sheriffs’ offices, and local police. Of course, Davenport and partner succeed, but only after ~300 pages. I read it in one sitting. 4✭

Listening.

The Rose Code by Kate Quinn. This is another book set during WWII with a plot that centers on spycraft, in particular, code breaking. The protagonists are three vastly different young women who are recruited to work at Bletchley Park, where a captured German Enigma machine makes the code breaking far faster and easier. The audiobook is almost 16 hours long; I have 4 hours left. I suspect I will not want it to end. 4✭

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a* (historical note)The author won me over by properly referring to Leonardo only by his first name; having been born out of wedlock, custom at the time deprived him of a surname. So when someone refers to him as Da Vinci, you will know they are not as educated as they might think.

Posted in Unraveled Wednesdays | 5 Comments